Thursday, May 26, 2011

SAT scores by State 2010 - 10 Year Trend from 2000 - 2010


Basically New York spends the highest per pupil and gets 46th Rank in Mean 2010 SAT Scores by State. In addition to that New York SAT scores have fallen over the last decade 2000-2010 in Reading by 10 and Math by 7.


States with 60% Participation Rate or Higher New York is ranked 13th.


The College Board has released the results of the 2010 SAT. New York lags the nation in total SAT score, even among states with high participation rates among students (states with low participation rates tend to score highly, as most students in those states take the ACT, and only very competitive college-bound students take the SAT).

New York state spent more money per student in its public schools than any other state in the nation in 2009, according to a Census Bureau report released Wednesday. 

New York averaged $18,126 in per-pupil spending, according to the census data, far higher than the national average of $10,499 per student. A Newsday analysis of census data also showed the spending average among Long Island's 124 school districts was even higher -- $23,972.


CRM = Critical Reading Mean
MM  = Math Mean
WM  = Writing Mean

Participation 2010 2009 1-Year Change 2000 10-Year Change
State Rate 2010* CRM MM WM CRM MM WM Critical Reading Math Writing CRM MM Critical Reading Math
Maine 92% 468 467 454 468 467 455 0 0 -1 504 500 -36 -33
Massachusetts 86% 512 526 509 514 526 510 -2 0 -1 511 513 +1 +13
New York 85% 484 499 478 485 502 478 -1 -3 0 494 506 -10 -7
Connecticut 84% 509 514 513 509 513 512 0 +1 +1 508 509 +1 +5
New Hampshire 77% 520 524 510 523 523 510 -3 +1 0 520 519 0 +5
District of Columbia 76% 474 464 466 466 451 461 +8 +13 +5 494 486 -20 -22
New Jersey 76% 495 514 497 496 513 496 -1 +1 +1 498 513 -3 +1
Georgia 74% 488 490 475 490 491 479 -2 -1 -4 488 486 0 +4
Delaware 71% 493 495 481 495 498 484 -2 -3 -3 502 496 -9 -1
Pennsylvania 71% 492 501 480 493 501 483 -1 0 -3 498 497 -6 +4
Maryland 70% 501 506 495 500 502 495 +1 +4 0 507 509 -6 -3
Rhode Island 67% 494 495 488 498 496 494 -4 -1 -6 505 500 -11 -5
Virginia 67% 512 512 497 511 512 498 +1 0 -1 509 500 +3 +12
South Carolina 66% 484 495 468 486 496 470 -2 -1 -2 484 482 0 +13
Vermont 66% 519 521 506 518 518 506 +1 +3 0 513 508 +6 +13
Indiana 64% 494 505 477 496 507 480 -2 -2 -3 498 501 -4 +4
North Carolina 63% 497 511 477 495 511 480 +2 0 -3 492 496 +5 +15
Florida 59% 496 498 479 497 498 480 -1 0 -1 498 500 -2 -2
Hawaii 58% 483 505 470 479 502 469 +4 +3 +1 488 519 -5 -14
Oregon 54% 523 524 499 523 525 499 0 -1 0 527 527 -4 -3
Washington 54% 524 532 508 524 531 507 0 +1 +1 526 528 -2 +4
Texas 53% 484 505 473 486 506 475 -2 -1 -2 493 500 -9 +5
California 50% 501 516 500 500 513 498 +1 +3 +2 497 518 +4 -2
Alaska 48% 518 515 491 520 516 492 -2 -1 -1 519 515 -1 0
Nevada 43% 496 501 473 501 505 479 -5 -4 -6 510 517 -14 -16
Arizona 25% 519 525 500 516 521 497 +3 +4 +3 521 523 -2 +2
Montana 24% 538 538 517 541 542 519 -3 -4 -2 543 546 -5 -8
Ohio 21% 538 548 522 537 546 523 +1 +2 -1 533 539 +5 +9
Idaho 19% 543 541 517 541 540 520 +2 +1 -3 540 541 +3 0
Colorado 18% 568 572 555 568 575 555 0 -3 0 534 537 +34 +35
West Virginia 16% 515 507 500 511 501 499 +4 +6 +1 526 511 -11 -4
New Mexico 11% 553 549 534 553 546 534 0 +3 0 549 543 +4 +6
Tennessee 10% 576 571 565 571 565 565 +5 +6 0 563 553 +13 +18
Alabama 7% 556 550 544 557 552 549 -1 -2 -5 559 555 -3 -5
Louisiana 7% 555 550 547 563 558 555 -8 -8 -8 562 558 -7 -8
Minnesota 7% 594 607 580 595 609 578 -1 -2 +2 581 594 +13 +13
Illinois 6% 585 600 577 588 604 583 -3 -4 -6 568 586 +17 +14
Kansas 6% 590 595 567 581 589 564 +9 +6 +3 574 580 +16 +15
Kentucky 6% 575 575 563 573 573 561 +2 +2 +2 548 550 +27 +25
Utah 6% 568 559 547 559 558 540 +9 +1 +7 570 569 -2 -10
Michigan 5% 585 605 576 584 603 575 +1 +2 +1 557 569 +28 +36
Oklahoma 5% 569 568 547 575 571 557 -6 -3 -10 563 560 +6 +8
Wyoming 5% 570 567 546 567 568 550 +3 -1 -4 545 545 +25 +22
Arkansas 4% 566 566 552 572 572 556 -6 -6 -4 563 554 +3 +12
Missouri 4% 593 595 580 595 600 584 -2 -5 -4 572 577 +21 +18
Nebraska 4% 585 593 568 587 594 572 -2 -1 -4 560 571 +25 +22
North Dakota 4% 580 594 559 590 593 566 -10 +1 -7 588 609 -8 -15
Wisconsin 4% 595 604 579 594 608 582 +1 -4 -3 584 597 +11 +7
Iowa 3% 603 613 582 610 615 588 -7 -2 -6 589 600 +14 +13
Mississippi 3% 566 548 552 567 554 559 -1 -6 -7 562 549 +4 -1
South Dakota 3% 592 603 571 589 600 569 +3 +3 +2 587 588 +5 +15
All students 47% 501 516 492 501 515 493 0 +1 -1 505 514 -4 +2

Source: Collegeboard.com

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Long Island Property taxes most important issue, say LIers

No surprise here ! To stop this ridiculous rise in property taxes we have to educate our fellow LIers and contact your representative that they should demand Speaker Silver respond to the pleas of homeowners across the state and support a property tax cap in New York. It has already passed the senate but is being stalled in the Assembly by Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver.

Also this year we are seeing some enormous rise in property taxes in school districts such as
William Floyd 12.47% and Seaford 8.99%. Some school districts such as Middle country is resorting to blackmailing its residents. The deal for districts residents is either approved a 6.68% increase or the district is going to force 21.61% increase in tax levy.


Published by THOMAS MAIER at Newsday

By a wide margin, property taxes are the most important issue facing Long Islanders, according to a Newsday / News 12 Long Island / Siena Research Institute Poll. Property taxes were cited overall by 45 percent of respondents, more than twice the 21 percent who cited "availability of good jobs" as the second most pressing issue for Long Islanders. "Property taxes are really an issue here because it keeps the young people from staying on Long Island and it will prevent the older people from staying, too," Tafuri explained.

Property taxes also are a large part of why the 57 percent of those polled said Long Islanders are headed in the "wrong direction" rather than the "right track" in the poll. A similar margin said New York State was headed in the wrong direction as well.

Property taxes are a particularly raw issue in Nassau County, where 53 percent cited them as the biggest issue, compared to 36 percent in Suffolk. Islandwide, Republicans and people 55 years or older complained about property taxes the most. "The Democrats love to spend money and they have to get it from the taxpayers," said one poll respondent, a retired Republican who lives on Nassau County's South Shore.

School costs - the biggest part of property tax bills - were also on the minds of Long Islanders who cited "the quality of public schools" among their top concerns. "The first thing I would do is eliminate tenure for teachers in public schools to cut costs," said another poll respondent, a 50-year-old Garden City man who is a Republican and who did not want to give his name. Although he was happy that his two children attending local schools got a good education there, he said his family's property tax bill has been overwhelming.

Property taxes hit a chord with all respondents, regardless of age, race, gender, religion, location or party affiliation. In addition to identifying the most important issue, the poll underlined the intensity of Long Islanders' general feelings about property taxes, with 86 percent calling the issue "very important" and 11 percent as "somewhat important." Crime, schools, good jobs and health care also received strong reactions, with traffic congestion and the local environment getting milder reactions.